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Gummiballonger – nedbrytingstest – 26/03/17 – observasjoner

Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing 26/03/2018 Observations

PEBA Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing Perth W.A. 26 March. 2018

5 Months

More volunteers are required to carry out these tests in Australia and around the world. If you are keen to participate, please see details at www.peba.com.au/

Observations

1 x Standard White – Severe deterioration. Neck has totally broken away. Numerous holes and splits. Balloon is disintegrating. One side of the balloon nearly “gone”. Other side starting to break down. Balloon would break up into tiny pieces with any movement.

1 x Fashion Black – Severe oxidation. Several holes and splits down both sides. Balloon starting to break down Least affected balloon. Holes and splitting developing.

1 x Standard Yellow – Massive deterioration. Neck has broken away. Numerous holes and splits. Balloon is disintegrating. Second side breaking down.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Ruby Red – Further massive deterioration.  Balloon falling apart. Small pieces breaking away. Second side showing severe deterioration. Balloon in pieces

1 x Diamond Clear – Severe deterioration. Balloon has collapsed into itself. Splits and holes. Balloon has broken into 3 parts. Balloon shrinking into very small pieces

1 x Jewel / Crystal Emerald Green – Now showing severe deterioration and splits. Piece of the balloon has broken away. Second side starting to deteriorate.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Pink –  Further massive deterioration. Balloon falling apart. Balloon basically in pieces. Second side starting to break down. Balloon in tiny pieces.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Sapphire Blue – Further severe deterioration. Balloon breaking up. Substantial number of holes, splits and cracking. Neck broken away. Whole balloon falling apart.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Lime Green – Further severe deterioration of the whole balloon. Holes, splits and severe cracking. Balloon breaking up into tiny pieces.

Further Notes:

The balloons are in a position where they only receive between 3 and 4 hours of full sun, per day. The results of balloons in full sun would be interesting.

If the balloons were situated so that they were moved around by the wind, many of them would be even further broken down.

Under these conditions there is already a strong indication that latex balloons will not have a significant long term effect on the environment.

Simple Equation:

Positive effect on greenhouse gases and hence global warming.
+
No Balloon Releases.
+
Dispose of balloons correctly, as you would with any other product.
=
Either none, or extremely insignificant detrimental effect on our environment.

Gummiballonger – nedbrytingstest – 26/01/17 – observasjoner

Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing 26/01/2018 Observations

PEBA Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing Perth W.A. 26 Jan. 2018

4 Months

More volunteers are required to carry out these tests in Australia and around the world. If you are keen to participate, please see details at www.peba.com.au/

Observations

1 x Standard White – Severe deterioration. Neck has totally broken away. Numerous holes and splits. Balloon is disintegrating.

1 x Fashion Black – Severe oxidation. Several holes and splits. Least affected balloon.

1 x Standard Yellow – Severe deterioration. Neck has broken away. Numerous holes and splits. Balloon is disintegrating.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Ruby Red – Further massive deterioration.  Balloon falling apart.

1 x Diamond Clear – Severe deterioration. Balloon has collapsed into itself. Splits and holes.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Emerald Green – Deterioration around the neck. Severe oxidation. Splits developing.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Pink –  Further massive deterioration. Balloon falling apart. Balloon basically in pieces.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Sapphire Blue – Severe deterioration. Balloon breaking up. Substantial number of holes, splits and cracking.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Lime Green – Further severe deterioration of the whole balloon. Holes, splits and severe cracking.

Further Notes:

The balloons are in a position where they only receive between 3 and 4 hours of full sun, per day. The results of balloons in full sun would be interesting.

If the balloons were situated so that they were moved around by the wind, many of them would be even further broken down.

Simple Equation:

Positive effect on greenhouse gases and hence global warming.
+
No Balloon Releases.
+
Dispose of balloons correctly, as you would with any other product.
=
Either none, or extremely insignificant detrimental effect on our environment.

 

Gummiballonger – nedbrytingstest – 21/12/17 – observasjoner

Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing 21/12/2017 Observations

Many people have expressed interest in conducting testing on the biodegradability of latex balloons. Whether you are a member of PEBA (Pro Environment Balloon Alliance), or not, it would be fantastic to have you involved. I have tried to set the test up using correct “Scientific Method”.  Who’s in?

The test consists of:

  • 1 x open 13 litre container (Bunnings), or similar, with a couple of holes drilled in the base, filled to three quarters with soil from your local area.
  • 9 x Latex Balloon (Manufacturer of Your Choice)

1 x Standard White  Severe oxidation, deterioration of the neck and several holes.

1 x Fashion Black  Oxidation, least affected balloon.

1 x Standard Yellow Severe Oxidation and numerous holes.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Ruby Red  Massive deterioration. Balloon falling apart.

1 x Diamond Clear Severe deterioration. Balloon has collapsed into itself.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Emerald Green Deterioration around the neck. Severe oxidation.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Pink  Massive deterioration around neck. Balloon falling apart

1 x Pearl / Metallic Sapphire Blue Severe deterioration around neck. One hole.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Lime Green  Numerous holes and severe deterioration of the whole balloon.

  • It is interesting that the Fashion Black and Jewel Emerald Green have been the slowest balloons to break down, yet they are the fastest when still in their packaging.
  • The balloons should be inflated to size and then let down. This is because most balloons that find their way into the environment have been inflated.
  • The variety of balloons and colours has been selected because experience tells us that some balloons (e.g. darker colours and Jewel / Crystal) biodegrade faster than others and it is necessary to measure the difference.
  • The container should not be covered and should be left outside under all weather conditions.
  • Please photograph your experiment every 30 days (or less) and take note of any changes, etc.
  • The data collected from these tests conducted under different soil and weather conditions will be invaluable.
  • I will also be doing two separate tests, using beach sand and sea water.
  • Data updates and all results will be published on www.peba.com.au

21/12/2017

Gummiballonger – nedbrytingstest – 26/11/17 – observasjoner

Dette innlegget er kopiert fra www.peba.com.au (PEBA)

 Latex Balloon Biodegradability Testing 26/11/2017 Observations

Many people have expressed interest in conducting testing on the biodegradability of latex balloons. Whether you are a member of PEBA (Pro Environment Balloon Alliance), or not, it would be fantastic to have you involved. I have tried to set the test up using correct “Scientific Method”.  Who’s in?

The test consists of:

  • 1 x open 13 litre container (Bunnings), or similar, with a couple of holes drilled in the base, filled to three quarters with soil from your local area.
  • 9 x Latex Balloon (Manufacturer of Your Choice)

1 x Standard White  Further oxidation and deterioration.

1 x Fashion Black  Some oxidation and fading

1 x Standard Yellow Severe  Fading / Oxidation.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Ruby Red Severe fading / Holes in the balloon.

1 x Diamond Clear Severe oxidation and breakdown of the balloon. Balloon has collapsed into itself.

1 x Jewel / Crystal Emerald Green Substantial Oxidation and deterioration.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Pink  Severe Fading / Oxidation and a hole in the side of the balloon.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Sapphire Blue Severe Fading / Oxidation.

1 x Pearl / Metallic Lime Green  Severe Fading / Oxidation / some deterioration.

  • The balloons should be inflated to size and then let down. This is because most balloons that find their way into the environment have been inflated.
  • The variety of balloons and colours has been selected because experience tells us that some balloons (e.g. darker colours and Jewel / Crystal) biodegrade faster than others and it is necessary to measure the difference.
  • The container should not be covered and should be left outside under all weather conditions.
  • Please photograph your experiment every 30 days (or less) and take note of any changes, etc.
  • The data collected from these tests conducted under different soil and weather conditions will be invaluable.
  • I will also be doing two separate tests, using beach sand and sea water.
  • Data updates and all results will be published on www.peba.com.au

26/11/2017

European Balloon & Party Council Fact Sheet (26/10/17)

EBPC statement on Balloon Releases

‘The EBPC does not support balloon releases’

Balloons are a unique much loved product and are considered irreplaceable in what they offer. Over the last few years the industry has seen changes in consumer viewpoints and perceptions related to such products. Although these changes and increased participation have surfaced in the last few years, these may have always been the case as the rise of social media platforms and technology has enabled better reporting of such viewpoints and perceptions.

To comply with the EBPC mission statement “To educate and promote the fun use of balloons and party products safely, ethically and in respect of the environment”, and as a responsible organisation shaping our industry – we recognise the impact of our products within its marketplace. This monitoring along with our corporate social responsibility has led the council to pioneer new thinking within our industry on how balloons should be handled in respect of the environment, which has led to an agreement that ‘The EBPC does not support balloon releases’ as we wish to protect the environment from unnecessary litter. While latex balloons are biodegradable and the moment of release is visually appealing, the resulting deflated or partially inflated balloons that return to the ground is visually offensive to many, and we must respect this. This is becoming even more importantly recognised as local authorities across the world are introducing penalties for balloon releases on their property.

The EBPC provides a united front to protect and grow the industry by promoting and facilitating best practices through the coalition of its members across the EU. We look to all members to support our stance in this good cause and encourage promotion of this positive message with respect to the environment.

For further information, please take a look at our website at www.ebpcouncil.eu.

The European Balloon & Party Council



Clean Up Australia Rubbish Report (22/7/17)

Balloons come under the category of rubber in this report. The good news is that, rubber only counted for 1% of all rubbish collected. 73.1% of this 1% consisted of gloves, shoes and thongs. Balloons did not even rate their own category, or in fact, a mention, at all. Having said that, balloon litter is still being found in our environment and perhaps our aim for a zero result is over optimistic, but still a very worthwhile goal.

Link til rapporten

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